Job and Zophar. Job’s friend Zophar answered, ‘Will your empty talk reduce men to silence? Will no one rebuke you for what you have said? I wish that God would speak up against you.

Day 24 (Jan. 24): Job calls for sympathy, Zophar says the wicked’s revelry is temporary, Job argue’s Zophar’s speech

Glory Story / FreeBibleimages.org

Welcome to Livin’ Light’s Bible-In-A-Year challenge of discovering God’s love for us and His purpose for our lives. Here is the format for this great adventure: The daily reading assignment is posted at 5 a.m. After each day’s reading, Leigh An Coplin, the blog host, shares observations and poses questions about difficult passages to Rob Fields, who studied Christian Education at Asbury Seminary and currently teaches Biology in the Orlando area. To start from the beginning, click on 365 Bible Readings and scroll down to Day 1. The reading schedule is taken from The One Year Chronological Bible NLT. 

Today’s Reading
— Job 19-21
(Before 2100 BC) Click here for a timeline of the whole Bible

Questions & Observations

Q. (19:7-20): As painful of a state as Job sounds, there is some humor in this.  I want to say “Poor Eeyore.”  I was surprised to see even his stinky breath in his ranting, like Job is saying, “What kind of sick trick are you playing on me, God?”  The tone of his statements seems to communicate that he knows he is not deserving of this fate.  Would you agree?

A. That would certainly be consistent with his message throughout the text.  He, as a righteous man, is suffering the “sick joke” as you put it, while many who deserve punishment lavish or get away with it.

Job actually makes a good point (21:26) : if this life is all there is, then ultimately there is no justice.  As he said, if death is the end, the we, rich and poor, all end up in the same grave to decay.  In order for there to be justice (and a just God), the afterlife is needed.

Q. (19:29): Again, I see humor in this saga.  Now Job is acting as God when he says, “for your attitude deserves punishment.”  To me, it’s only human for Job and his friends to judge one another.  Everyone would think that someone with such bad luck surely has wronged God.  And, being human, would probably speak up about it, especially as vocal as these characters are.  How can you blame either side for saying what they are saying?  It’s the blind accusing the blind.  Both don’t know God’s reasoning for this devastation and would never be able to guess it. Yet they are put in the middle of the God/Satan challenge and wondering, “what is going on here?” to put it lightly.  Any comment?

A. It is in our nature to try and find the reason for things; we all desire to be able to “pull back the curtain” and reveal the wizard (to borrow from the Wizard of Oz).  The problem, as this story reveals, is that very often we are TERRIBLE at making these types of judgments.  Hopefully this story can teach us to be careful about judging motive, the sins a person may or may not be hiding, or their relationship with God.  Very often we stand ready to condemn, but it is almost always with only limited information.  If God shows restraint in His condemnation, then we should make it our practice as well.

Q. (20:4-5): Is Zophar accusing Job of being godless?  How well did these “friends” know Job?

A. I don’t think Zophar means that Job is an atheist, but rather that he is concerned that Job’s walk with God is badly out of sync.  Job is talking like a godless man: he is accusing God of being unjust to him, and Zophar appears concerned that nothing good will come of that.

We have no real outside information on how well Job’s friends knew him.

Q.  In 21:16, Job still shows his loyalty to God, but he doesn’t know why he does, given the “unfair” treatment between the godless and followers.  I don’t know if Job’s views are fact or if he is just saying these statements of unfairness because of his own despair and he is assuming that the Godless have a great life.  Is he just pouting?  This reminds me about a comment I almost typed out the other day.  I was going to say that Job was like a modern-day Warren Buffett.  But, then I wikipedia’d Warren Buffet and found out he was agnostic.  This is an example of Job’s beef — the Godless enjoy life.

A. I actually like the idea of Job being a “pouter” as you put it.  He’s waiting around for his “day in court”, and he appears to be sick of his friends “help” and getting no response from who he really wants answers from — God Himself.

(Since as far as I know Buffett is still alive, I would say he is agnostic).  Folks like Buffett and many successful (by this world’s standards anyway) folks who amass great wealth would seem to prove Job’s point: he is accusing God of allowing the godless to enjoy the good life, while so many others just get by or even starve to death.  Here again, this makes the afterlife even more important.

Tomorrow’s reading: Job 22-25

Job questions God. ob chapters 16-32: Job says, ‘What miserable comforters you are.’ He believes there is a Redeemer in heaven who will vouch for his innocence. He feels he is being treated unfairly as he cries to God for help but gets no response. Job asks why God allows wicked people to live in prosperity and health while he suffers but knows that God will bring justice in the end. Job starts recounting the good deeds he has done and how he has obeyed the Lord. The three friends stop arguing with Job as he continues to be right in his own eyes.

Day 22 (Jan. 22): Job defends his character to his friends, Job argues and questions God

Welcome to Livin’ Light’s Bible-In-A-Year challenge of discovering God’s love for us and His purpose for our lives. Here is the format for this great adventure: The daily reading assignment is posted at 5 a.m. After each day’s reading, Leigh An Coplin, the blog host, shares observations and poses questions about difficult passages to Rob Fields, who studied Christian Education at Asbury Seminary and currently teaches Biology in the Orlando area. To start from the beginning, click on 365 Bible Readings and scroll down to Day 1. The reading schedule is taken from The One Year Chronological Bible NLT. 

Today’s Reading
Job 12-14
(Before 2100 BC) Click here for a timeline of the whole Bible

Questions & Observations

At first I thought I wouldn’t have many questions with this reading other than to highlight a couple points about Job’s ranting to God.  But, I found that in his anger, he makes such good points that we can easily relate and pose great subjects for our discussion.  He gets down to the rift between being human and struggling to obey God. 

Q. (Job 12:5-6): I think I understand what Job is trying to say in verse 5:  Those who are living without despair think they have all the answers and advice for those living in despair.  But, I don’t understand verse 6.

A. Job is attacking God for what he perceives as a lack of justice.  He is arguing that though he, a righteous man, is unjustly punished, the real evildoers are “getting away with it.”  I think we understand this verse very well, it is one of the most common refrains when we are going through suffering: we tell God that we feel that we don’t deserve it, and that since we’re better than (say) hardened criminals or those Wall Street fat cats, shouldn’t they be the ones getting punished?  It’s the flip side of the theodicy argument: too often we feel that bad things are NOT happening to bad people, at least as we see it.

Q. (12:7-9): Job is saying those that do not judge — animals — can testify that his devastation is not a punishment for anything he has done wrong.  Right?

A. I think Job is pointing to nature to make his case that God does as he pleases.

Q. (12:13): At first I just quickly read over this verse.  Then, I read it again and soaked it in letting the following verses support it.  I see two things in this verse: He is all-powerful, no question; and we cannot understand his reasoning.  Should we elaborate about this now or will it be expanded on later?

A. Let’s hold onto this thought, since it will really come into play around chapter 38.

Q. (13:1-12): To me, Job is saying here, if you have a gripe with God, you should go directly to Him and not rely on others for clarification because they cannot speak for God.  I feel that Job is questioning his friends’ relationships with God.  Job is putting the question to His friends that if they were so close to God, they would not be accusing Job of hiding this alleged sin from God.  Do I have this right?

A. Seems right to me.  He is certainly saying that they presume to speak for God, but Job doesn’t want to hear from them (especially since he doesn’t really like what they are saying), rather, he wants God to speak to him directly.  Classic example of a person not being careful what they wish for, which I think you’ll see.

O. (13:16): Job is saying that because he has a relationship with God that he is able to confront God.  To me, this is the way God wants us to be: acknowledge Him, grow close to Him through understanding Him, and glorify Him.

O. (13:20-25): Job can speak so candidly here 1) because of his loyalty to God, he probably feels like he deserves to be heard and 2) because of his anger.  When I am angry or hurt, the tough questions roll out.  I can’t hold them back.

Q. (13:26-14:6): Job seems to say “God you have us trapped.  You have put us here with your rules.  So can you just leave us alone while we live out our prescribed lives?” (14:1): Being a human, sinning is imminent, so why is God picking out all of our faults when we can’t help but sin?

A. Why does any parent insist on disciplining a rebellious teenager, even when the teenager says, “just leave me alone”?  It’s because the parent knows the danger in the behavior of the child, even when the child doesn’t see it or want to acknowledge it.  Ultimately, God’s anger at our sin is out of love for us; He desires that we would make wise choices and follow after the way that He wants to guide us in living (we will see this concept develop over the remainder of the Bible).

Another way to look at it is to think of the concept of what kind of God our Lord would be if He let sin slide; that God adopted what we might call a “boys will be boys” attitude.  Such a god would not be worthy of worship (and is not the God described in scripture).  To ignore or even cause injustice (especially as it relates to our personal lives and our families) would mean that God was not ultimately good.  If, God forbid, we had a family member murdered, we would not think much of a human criminal justice system that said, “but you only did it once” to the person responsible and let them go free.  If you were part of the family that lost a family member, you would rightly say, “Once is more than enough!”  It would be a miscarriage of justice (even by human standards) for sin like that to be ignored or marginalized.  Is it any wonder that a God that is not only just, but actually DEFINES just, cannot turn a blind eye to sin?  Though it may be in our nature, that does not make us any less responsible for our sinful decisions.  Thus, we see the paramount reason for our need for Jesus Christ: because God’s justice will not ignore our sin, and God’s love cannot ignore His children.  The cross where Jesus died can be seen as the union where God’s desire to be just AND to love His children come together to set all things right.

Response: That last sentence was an awesome explanation!

Q. (14:13): Job’s cup is definitely not half full here.  He has nothing good to say to God.  He seems to have lost hope.  I can’t imagine being in his shoes and the anger he must feel.  How can you love and praise God when you are so angry with Him?

A. Honestly, I’m not sure how to answer that question because (thank God) my life has been greatly blessed, and I’ve never been that angry with God.  I guess the answer, which may sound flippant, is to choose to.  I believe that our love for God is, by God’s very design, a choice, and one that God goes to incredible lengths to respect.  I believe that God understands our anger, and the difficulty of expressing our love to Him when we are angry.  He will wait patiently, as the father character in the story of the Prodigal Son story in Luke 15.  But in the end, we must hope that the anger fades, and we can make our peace and return to right relationship with God.  Let’s see how Job does this as the story continues.

Q. (14:20-22): This sounds like the ultimate accusation from Job to God.  This is one that I hadn’t thought of: How do You create us, just to let us wither and die, not even giving us the satisfaction of seeing or children grow.  When we are gone, we are gone.  In this day, there was no promise of eternal life, right?

A. That’s a matter of some debate, but my understanding of Jewish theology moves more towards concepts of resurrection and eternal life as we move closer to the present day (so, say in the Prophets or Nehemiah, which were written much more recently than Job).  Yet here again, we are created beings, and not the Creator.  We must be very careful about making any sort of demand to the one who created us.  Ultimately, God alone has the final say in the span our of life, but the decisions He makes about life and death are just one more area where we as Christians must trust that He is working out things for the best, even if His reasons for doing so are clouded behind the veil of our own death.  We may not be able to see any reason for God’s decisions until we have crossed to the other side.

For further reading: Job, fact or fiction? https://christiancourier.com/articles/can-job-be-a-true-story or, https://answersingenesis.org/is-the-bible-true/book-of-job-fact-or-fiction/

Shop: Job was one who held steadfast to the Lord, despite horrendous trials.  Campout on the Lord and you’ll be set!

Tomorrows’ reading: Job 15-18

Bildad and Zophar speak to Job. Job's friends plead their case that Job must have sinned. Job stays steadfast for God

Day 21 (Jan. 21): Bildad accuses Job, Job reveres God’s power, Job pleas to God, Zophar calls Job to repent and praise

Sweet Publishing / FreeBibleimages.org

Welcome to Livin’ Light’s Bible-In-A-Year challenge of discovering God’s love for us and His purpose for our lives. Here is the format for this great adventure: The daily reading assignment is posted at 5 a.m. After each day’s reading, Leigh An Coplin, the blog host, shares observations and poses questions about difficult passages to Rob Fields, who studied Christian Education at Asbury Seminary and currently teaches Biology in the Orlando area. To start from the beginning, click on 365 Bible Readings and scroll down to Day 1. The reading schedule is taken from The One Year Chronological Bible NLT. 

Today’s Reading
Job 8-11
(Before 2100 BC) Click here for a timeline of the whole Bible.

Questions & Observations

O. (Job 8:1-7): In 1:8, God held Job in high regard.  Yet, after you read what Bildad is saying in 8:4, you think, maybe Job is being punished for these sins.  But, this sounds like the devil working his way in to get Job to turn and believe his friend.  Yes, Job’s sons apparently partied.  We don’t know if they actually sinned.  Job was looking out for them by offering sacrifices for them.  We know that God was pleased with Job.  Yet, this friend is acting like he knows God’s reasoning and trying to get Job to question his own righteousness.

O. (8:20-22): Bildad is putting words in God’s mouth.  Bildad says that God sends nothing but good things to believers.  Through this devastation, Job has learned otherwise.

Q. (9:14-20): Wow.  Rob, the guy who is answering these questions, told me that we would get into deep stuff in Job, he was right.  This passage says EXACTLY what I’m feeling as I’m doing this blog.  I want to know God’s reasoning, but I get so scared to ask about it.  It’s hard to fathom just how powerful God is.  I think about that we are spinning on a sphere in the middle of nowhere and yet we don’t think twice about our existence.  That, not to mention the seas, mountains and everything else that Job mentions displays his power, so how dare we question him.  I do feel though to try to understand the world that I have to ask these questions.  I’m beginning to think that understanding the world is like an “in” box, there is no end to it.  So, just seek guidance and stop asking so many questions.  I will try.  I am really enjoying studying it so far.  For me, Job offers more things to glean from than any of the Genesis stories.  Rob, can you talk about questioning God?

A. I certainly can.  While we must never forget our reverence for God and who He is, I for one have always believed that God can handle our tough questions, especially about His will.  In the person of Jesus Christ, we have the way that God shifted the relationship between Himself and human beings, and we should remember that this story long predates that relational shift.  Since we are in Christ, God sees each of us as sons and daughters (rather than servants), and one of the advantages of sonship and daughtership is that we can approach our Father in prayer with what is on our mind.  The Bible strongly encourages us to do so, in fact.  So when we have tough questions, we can know that the power of Christ has made it possible for us to (reverently and humbly) approach the throne of our Heavenly Father and present our tough questions.  We do not have to fear God when we do not understand or even question His will, what a privilege of being a child of God!

What we must keep in mind, however, is that God does not answer to us (one of the major themes of this book), and ultimately one of our jobs as followers of Christ is to trust that His way is best.

O. (9:22): Job is struggling here.  He’s flip-flopping between being faithful to the Lord and irate.

Q. (9:33): Job is foretelling Jesus?  Anything else?

A. I honestly don’t think even Job knows what he is asking for here, but in his statement we see the great truth of the Incarnation.  Job is asking for a being that can bring together God and man and force mediation (if you will).  This is one of the ways that the Church throughout the ages has come to see Jesus: as the only being who was both fully God and fully human (Hebrews 1:3 and 2:17), Jesus is the way that brings us together with God.  Job, I think, would not have understood the Incarnation, but the longing that he expresses: to be able to approach God, is a deep human longing that we all share.

O & Q. (10:2): I think getting answers from God — patience — is one of the hardest things to handle as a Christian.  As the leader of a past Bible story pointed out: We have a book, the Bible, to read and learn from.  The people in Bible times were living out the stories.  Their direction was from what God told the leaders.  Luckily, we can learn from their experiences.  What does the Bible say about having patience toward God?

A. I’m not sure I would use the word “patience” toward God, but would rather use words like “trust” and “faith”.  Isaiah 40 reminds us that those who trust in God will endure, and one of the central ideas from our discussion today is that we have to have faith in God’s ways (something Job is having a hard time doing), even when things are not going well for us.

O. Again, another of Job’s friends, Zophar is saying Job must have sinned to be receiving so much devastation.

For further interest
— Is it OK to question God? https://www.biblestudytools.com/bible-study/topical-studies/is-it-a-sin-to-question-god.html
— Are you into philosophical reasoning about the existence of God? https://gradresources.org/evidence-for-gods-existence/

Blog: Putting all the evidence together points to Him! https://livinlight.org/blog/proof-is-in-the-pudding/

Tomorrow’s reading: Job 12-14:22